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Princess Who Saved Herself | Mech Cadet Yu | Hulk | Code Monkey Save World | Please consider donating to writer Bill Mantlo's ongoing care!

Comics Written by Greg Pak

Creator-Owned: Code Monkey Save World, The CitizenKingsway WestLos Robos, Mech Cadet YuPhantom Limb Ghostpuncher, Rio Chino, Vision Machine

Aspen: Dead Man’s Run
BOOM: Big Trouble in Little China/Escape from New YorkMech Cadet Yu
Dark Horse: Kingsway West
DC Comics: Action Comics, Batman/Superman
Dynamite: Battlestar Galactica, John WickTurok
Marvel Comics: 1602: New World, Alpha Flight, Amadeus Cho, Astonishing X-Men, Doctor Strange Season One, Hercules, Hulk, Iron Man, Magneto Testament, Marvel Nemesis, Red Skull Incarnate, Silver Surfer, Skaar, StormWar Machine, Warbound, Warlock, Weapon H, Weapon XX-Men: Phoenix Endsong & Warsong, X-Treme X-Men
Valiant: Eternal Warrior

Last day to preorder the WHERE WE LIVE Las Vegas benefit anthology!

Today is the last day to preorder the WHERE WE LIVE comics anthology, which benefits the victims of the Las Vegas shooting. I’m proud and honored to have been invited to contribute a story, which Triona Farrell colored and Simon Bowland lettered. See below for a sneak preview image from that story.

You can preorder the book by calling your local comic book shop or, if you like mail order, buy it online from Thing From Another World.

Thanks for the consideration and all the best!

2018.04.18 – JOHN WICK #2 hits comic shops!

At long last, JOHN WICK #2 hits comic shops on April 18! Check out an 8.7/10 advance review from Chico Comics Page and ask your local comic shop to hold a copy for you today!

Art by Giovanni Valletta, colors by Inlight Studios, letters by Tom Napolitano, and script by yours truly.

2018.04.04 – MECH CADET YU #8 hits comic shops! Check out the preview!

MECH CADET YU #8, written by yours truly with art by Takeshi Miyazawa, colors by Triona Farrell, and letters by Simon Bowland, hits comic shops this coming Wednesday! Read on for a lettered preview of the issue and ask your comic shop to hold a copy for you today!

2018.03.23 – Greg Pak and Cory Smith sign WEAPON H #1 in NYC tonight!

Hey, New York! Artist Cory Smith and I are signing our new book WEAPON H #1 at Midtown Comics Downtown in New York City tonight starting at 6 pm!

Midtown Comics Downtown

64 Fulton Street, New York, New York 10038
Come see, come see!

2018.03.21 – WEAPON H #1 and INCREDIBLE HULK #714 in stores today!

Thrilled that WEAPON H #1 and INCREDIBLE HULK #714 hit comic book shops today! Ask your local shop to hold you copies!

WEAPON H #1 tells the story of Clay, an ex-soldier who’s been turned into a terrifying Hulk/Wolverine hybrid. Clay just wants to be left alone, but he can’t seem to stand by when innocents are threatened — no matter what the consequences. Line art by Cory Smith, colors by Morry Hollowell, and letters by Joe Caramagna. I absolutely love working on this book — it’s big, bombastic Marvel mayhem with a huge amount of emotional story and heart — my favorite kind of thing to write. Dontcha dare miss it!

INCREDIBLE HULK #714 is the start of my last story on the book — in which Amadeus Cho returns to Earth after a trip to Planet Sakaar — and finally loses his fight with the Dark Hulk within! Big, big consequences coming! Line art by Carlo Barbieri, inks by Walden Wong, colors by Frank D’Armata, letters by Cory Petit.

New Humble Bundle benefitting the Hero Initiative includes FOUR Greg Pak books

I’m thrilled to reveal that four of my books are part of the “Heroes of Indie Comics” Humble Bundle that benefits the Hero Initiative!

The Hero Initiative is a tremendous charity that helps out comics creators in need. Humble Bundle is a website through which you pay what you want for cool bundles of digital stuff with a percentage going to charity. You can even set exactly how much of your contribution goes to charity when you check out.

The “Heroes of Indie Comics” Humble Bundle includes ABC DISGUSTING, CODE MONKEY SAVE WORLD, THE PRINCESS WHO SAVED HERSELF, and KICKSTARTER SECRETS. I’m super proud of all those books and now you can get ’em dirt cheap, along with a slew of other books from folks like Fred Van Lente, Ryan Dunlavey, Jeff Lemire, Jill Thompson, Jimmy Palmiotti, and many more!

Please do check it out here and contribute today!

2018.02.14 – WEAPON X #14 hits stores on Valentine’s Day!

In a bit of awesome serendipity, WEAPON X #14, which features a big action romance moment between Warpath and Domino, hits stores on Valentine’s Day!

Check out the preview here.

And ask your local comic shop to hold a copy for you!

The book’s written by yours truly with art by Yildiray Cinar, colors by Frank D’armata, letters by Joe Caramagna, and that glorious cover by David Nakayama.

2018.02.07 – MECH CADET YU #6 in stores this Wednesday!

MECH CADET YU #6 hits comic shops this Wednesday! The book’s written by yours truly with art by Takeshi Miyazawa, colors by Triona Farrell, and letters by Simon Bowland and continues the story of a group of young cadets and their giant robots taking on the alien monsters known as the Sharg.

Check out the preview below and ask your local shop to hold a copy for you today!

 

2018.02.11 – Greg Pak does Kids’ Book Club and signs comics at Comix Experience in San Francisco!

 

Hey, I’m doing a kids’ book club event and a signing at the Comix Experience comic book shop in San Francisco this coming Sunday, February 11!

Check out the store’s Facebook page for the details!

See you soon, Bay Area!

How I Write a Comic Book Script

The other week I posted a few tweets about the practical steps I take when writing a comic book script. The thread took off and the initial tweet has now been viewed almost half a million times (!!!).  So here’s the whole thread, all cleaned up and expanded on — hope it’s helpful! (And if you’re intrigued by my ideas, please do subscribe to my email newsletter!)

How I Write a Comic Book Script

A big note up front: Everyone has a different process! This is just what works for me, right now, for the most part, most of the time. Be sure to check out what other writers do as well — here’s a fun thread from Tim Seeley describing his process, for example. Then figure out what works for you and do that.

So here’s what I do:

Just one example of my brilliant outlining.

1. Outline the whole thing. This is an entire topic unto itself. But if my outline is really working, it nails the big plot beats as well as the big emotional turning points and thematic brushstrokes — all the essential things that make the story work and matter. A great outline means the scripting goes MUCH more smoothly.

2. Break the outline down into pages.

3A. Break pages down into panels first, then add dialogue.

OR, depending on the scene and how I’m feeling:

3B: Hammer out some dialogue first, then break the pages down into panels.

NOTE: When determining panel breakdowns and page breaks, I always try end a page with some kind of mini cliffhanger. A question, a half finished thought, an action that gets completed on the next page. Gotta keep people turning pages!

4. Write from the beginning, but if I get stuck, skip around and write the easier scenes first.

5. Go back and write the harder scenes, which are easier now that I’ve done the rest.

6. If I’m really stuck on a scene/beat, call up my editor and talk it out. Editors are awesome. Sometimes they just nod and say “uh huh” and let me blab until I work it out. Sometimes they ask just the right questions. These calls ALWAYS help.

7. Rewrite the easier scenes now that I’ve written the harder scenes and know my story better.

8. Revisit the harder scenes again now that I’ve figured out what I needed to tweak in the easier scenes.

9. Go through and edit everything multiple times, paying special attention to little details, making sure I’m explaining what needs to be explained for the artist, and making sure that if, during revisions, I’ve added some detail or bit later in the script, I’m properly setting it up if necessary earlier in the script.

10. Turn it in when I run out of time.

11. Enjoy that fourteen minutes of calm you get after turning in a script.

12. Get feedback from my editors/creative collaborators and work on revisions.

13. Figure out what it’s REALLY all about and make the subtle dialogue and action tweaks that bring out that deeper theme/emotional thread.

Hardest parts of writing a script:

  • The outline.
  • The beginning (particularly working in exposition seamlessly in a serial story).
  • The ending/cliffhanger.
  • Pages 14-16 or so. Those beats before the climax.

(p.s. it’s all hard, sorry.)

Other thoughts:

There’s an interesting mechanical aspect to writing a script. Where you come up against page count limits, for example, and realize that helps you make decisions that work. For example, every once in a while, I’ll have a three page scene that’s hard to crack. So I’ll write everything that precedes & follows it. And suddenly I discover that there’s only a page left for the tricky scene — and that’s all it needed. Or maybe I don’t really need it at all.

(Relatedly, more than once, when I’ve had a huge amount of trouble figuring out how to crack a scene, I ultimately discovered that I didn’t need the scene. I had trouble cracking it because it didn’t belong.)

Two general notes to myself that always seems to work: Give your characters quiet moments that dramatize character, especially early in the script/story, and give the big emotional beats time to play out. Let it breathe when it needs to breathe.

There’s a kind of unspoken, panicky pressure, particularly in superhero comics, to blow something up pretty quickly. Understandable. Gotta grab people’s attention in five page previews. But action without emotional drama falls flat. Gotta take the time to build character and emotional drive.

Other ongoing activities essential to the writing process:

A. Drink a glass of water.

B. Get enough sleep and food.

C. Acknowledge that whatever you’re writing this very instant isn’t perfect, but you’re gonna revise it and make it better and “perfection” is an illusion anyway.

Finally, if you’re looking for more comics making advice from yours truly, please feel free to check out MAKE COMICS LIKE THE PROS, a how-to book I co-wrote with the great Fred Van Lente with amazing art by Colleen Coover.

And finally finally, if you like this kind of advice, please do subscribe to my revamped email newsletter, where I’ll be sharing this kind of thing regularly, along with all kinds of other sneak peeks and bonuses!

Thanks much and keep on writing!

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